Slow Cooker Beef Bone Broth

There’s no denying that bone broth is trendy AF in today’s wellness world. However, the reality of bone broth is that it’s been around for centuries. Although our ancestors likely made bone broth due to a “waste not, want not” mentality (which I can totally get down with), it’s also jam-packed with all kinds of nutrients. While this is not an exhaustive list by any means, here are some nutrients that bone broth contains:

  • Healing compounds like glycine, collagen, proline, and glutamine
  • Easy-to-absorb nutrients like calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, silicon, and sulfur
  • Anti-inflammatory compounds like condroitin sulfate and glucosamine

What do these nutrients do for the body? I’m so happy that you asked. Regular consumption of the above nutrients has the power to:

  • Heal leaky gut syndrome
  • Support the immune system
  • Improve joint and bone health
  • Eliminate food intolerances and allergies
  • Reduce cellulite and wrinkles
  • Boost cellular and liver detoxification

As someone who’s not a big meat eater, it’s important to me that I consume animal-based products mindfully. That’s why, when it comes to bone broth, one of my favorite brands is Kettle & Fire. So many “bone broths” on the market are a far cry from the real deal, but this company knows what’s up. Their bones come from 100% grass-fed, antibiotic-free, and hormone-free cattle. Their vegetables and herbs are organic. Their broth is slow-simmered for 20+ hours. Of course, with all of those wonderful things comes a hefty price tag. Once I could no longer keep up with my bone broth habit, I did some math and determined that making my own bone broth would be much more economical.

There are two crucial steps in the bone-broth-making process that cannot be missed! The first step, blanching, is crucial because it removes the nasty bits from the bones. You don’t want that funk in your broth! The second step, roasting, is arguably even more crucial because this is what gives the broth its dense, savory flavor. Skip this step and your bone broth will be…meh.

While we’re on the topic of flavor, let’s talk salt. Personally, I don’t add salt to this recipe because I prefer to season my broth just prior to consumption, depending on what I’m using the broth for at the time. Although I love to incorporate it into my cooking, more times than not, I simply heat it up, season it with some Himalayan salt, and sip it from a mug.

Making your own bone broth is not only economical, but also ridiculously easy. Throw some stuff in a pot, throw some stuff in the oven, throw some stuff in a slow cooker…BOOM! In terms of both nutrients and flavor, the longer your broth simmers, the better. So, as a nurse who works 12 hours shifts that leave me away from the home for at least 14 hours, I usually whip up a batch just prior to leaving for work. The delicious smell that I come home to is an added bonus.

Now, I present to you the recipe, which yields approximately 12 cups (96 oz) of broth.

What you’ll need:

  • 3 lbs beef marrow bones
  • 3 carrots, chopped into sticks
  • 3 celery stalks, chopped into sticks
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into eighths
  • 4 sprigs oregano (or herb of your choice)
  • 12 cups filtered water

What you’ll do:

  • Preheat the oven to 425ºF
  • Add the bones to a large pot, cover with water, and bring to a boil for roughly 20 minutes; after 20 minutes has elapsed, remove from heat
  • Using tongs, remove the bones from the water and add to a baking sheet lined with foil; roast in the oven for 1 hour, turning halfway through
  • Add all solid ingredients to your crockpot; cover with filtered water and cook on low for 12+ hours
  • Once your desired cook time has elapsed, strain through a fine meshed sieve and discard the solid ingredients

Storage:

  • Store the broth in four 32 oz mason jars, filling no further than the 24 oz line; this will prevent the jars from breaking as the broth freezes
  • Once the broth has been poured into mason jars, allow it to cool in the refrigerator prior to freezing; this will also prevent the jars from breaking as the broth freezes
  • I prefer to leave a jar in the refrigerator so that I have some readily available to me

4 thoughts on “Slow Cooker Beef Bone Broth

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